IH co-presents The Quiet Earth at the 2012 Doomsday Festival

 

The 2012 Doomsday Festival at 92Y Tribeca is already in full swing and we’re happy that tomorrow, Sunday (October 21), Incognitum Hactenus is co-presenting a screening of the 1985 Australian post-apocalyptic film The Quiet Earth.

The Quiet Earth shows us the unthinkable, the end of the world, as a result of a manmade shift in the fundamental fabric of the universe. Here, rather than seeing a dichotomy of the old versus the new (such as the zombie film), life (or Life) itself is obliterated. We only experience this “world without us” as Eugene Thacker would term through three characters who are quite literally the living dead (spoiler: they were in the process of death when the effect happen, thus allowing them to live, sort of). Their process of discovery and inherent knowledge that they are not long for this new world along with their loyalty to the old way of existing is as comfortable as it is frightening. The Quiet Earth is a slow and steady film into the lonely abyss.

IH co-editor will be doing an introduction to the film and Doomsday Fest has selected an incredible short, These Blazeing Starrs! Comets by Deborah Stratman, to play before the film. Starts at 6pm but we recommend getting there even earlier as this a fabulous series of shorts starting at 4pm!

Living On: Zombies Release Party

INCOGNITUM HACTENUS INVITES YOU TO…

LIVING ON: ZOMBIES RELEASE PARTY
Tuesday, October 2 from 7 – 9pm
Nitehawk Cinema (cafe)

Pre-party for the 9:30pm NY premiere of V/H/S (new horror anthology film released by Magnolia Pictures)

Screening: Jim Shaw’s The Hole (2007)
Spinning: “Undead Soul” by Dave Tompkins

Special horror cocktail: the Corpse Reviver
Stuff: Free digital copies of Living On: Zombies | check out books by contributors 

Thanks to Magnolia Pictures, Nitehawk Cinema, Blonde Art Books, Darren Banks, Dave Tompkins, and all of our contributors!

Three Films at Once: Shocking Representation at DAC

Shocking Representation.

Via invitation from Dumbo Arts Center, on Thursday (September 6) I presented a one-night event in support of my upcoming February exhibition at DA On the Desperate Edge of Now (historical trauma in horror film and contemporary art ) with Heather Cantrell, Folkert de Jong, Marnie Weber, and Joachim Koester.

On view was a simultaneous play of three horror films – Edgar G. Ulmer’s The Black Cat (1934), Bob Clark’s Deathdream or Dead of Night (1974), and the documentary The American Nightmare (2000) – merging social, political, and cinematic history into one monstrous audio-visual experience. 
 
The “screening” lasted for three hours during the Dumbo Art Walk. People came in, some stayed, some talked about the impact of these films culturally, others questioned if this was art to be hung on the walls of their home. But mostly, the ghosts of cinema floated on the wall, floating between the past and the future, in-and-out of sync, telling us stories from beyond the grave.